Cable Boxes are Screwing Independent Filmmakers. Google to the Rescue?

[I]f someone’s heard of your film, in order to actually find it on their cable box, they must: 1) know they have On Demand in the first place, 2) know where to find On Demand, 3) know which particular On Demand channel to search on, 4) know to search for several abbreviated versions of the title if they don’t find it initially, and 5) remember their PIN code to make the purchase, if they ever set it up in first place, and if they didn’t, know the default PIN code. Going through those steps, you go from 75% to 50% to 25% to 10% to 5% of the customers. By the time you narrow down the customer base to people who fit all of those criteria, we’ve already lost most of your potential viewers. […] When Google announced their first foray into TV four years ago, I wrote, optimistically, “Google TV is what independent filmmakers have been waiting for.” In retrospect, I couldn’t have been more wrong, because in turned out no one was waiting for Google TV — or, at least, no one was buying it. Google tried again with their Roku-esque dongle Chromecast, but that was never going to disrupt the industry except by lowering the price of entry. […] Microsoft is trying with the Xbox (which unfortunately has to resort to IR-blasting), Apple has long had a rumored next-gen TV product in the works, and now Google is trying again with its new Nexus Player, which runs the latest version of Android TV. Similar to how Google launches unbranded Nexus phones as an example of best practices for Android phones, the Nexus Player is an unbranded example of what other manufacturers can do with Android TV. – Ryan Koo,No Film School 
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