Tag Archives: Antenna

ATSC 3.0: How cord-cutters should plan for antenna TV’s big upgrade

The benefits of this standard are clear: Better reception, 4K HDR video support, Dolby Atmos and DTS-X support, on-demand video, and possibly even streaming to mobile devices and automobiles. (The standard also has also some iffier aspects, such as targeted advertising.) But ATSC 3.0 comes with one big caveat as well: While the new standard will work with any antenna, it’s incompatible with the ATSC 1.0 tuners built into today’s TVs, converter boxes, and DVRs. – Jared Newman, TechHive » https://ift.tt/38aASOA

BTV brings local TV to your phone and desktop for free

[LocalBTV] already live in the San Francisco Bay Area and Phoenix, with Los Angeles planned next. The company hopes to be in the 40 biggest metropolitan areas of the U.S. by the end of 2019. […] The TV stations are received at Didja’s data centers, run through TV tuners, bundled with a TV guide, and streamed out over Apple’s HLS live streaming protocol to the app. – Martyn Williams, TechHive http://ift.tt/2zQpF60

Radio thrives as a place for music discovery despite the streaming threat

Although it seems like streaming services like Spotify and Apple Music are dominating the music scene, the 2017 edition of Nielsen’s Music 360 report found that 49% of people still discover new tunes via good ol’ fashioned AM/FM radio. As you can see in this chart from Statista.com, that compares 27% who use online music services. – Caroline Cakebread, Business Insider http://ift.tt/2kDZxay

Where’s the antenna support on streaming-TV boxes?

Antenna use is on the rise. According to Parks Associates Research, 15 percent of U.S. homes with broadband service used an antenna instead of traditional pay TV service in Q3 2016, up from around 10 percent a couple years earlier. Over-the-air has become so prevalent that Nielsen is now tracking antenna channel viewership in many markets, as it does with cable. – Jared Newman, TechHive http://ift.tt/2hQjfi4

Local channels in streaming bundles: Why they’re hard to get, and how that’s changing

Broadcast retransmission fees are a lucrative revenue stream for TV networks and affiliates, and a big driver of rising cable TV bills, so streaming bundles could see similar price increases over time. PlayStation Vue is a great example, charging $10 per month more in markets where it carries a majority of live local stations. That brings the base price up to $40 per month—$5 more than the starting price of YouTube TV and DirecTV Now—even if you’d rather get those same local channels for free with an antenna. – Jared Newman, TechHive http://ift.tt/2q9OPHc

FCC takes first step toward over-the-air 4K broadcasting

On Thursday, the [Federal Communications Commission] published a proposed regulation that would allow TV stations to begin broadcasts using the ATSC3.0 format, a newer version of the digital transmission format used today. ATSC 3.0 uses an IP data stream, so it’s much more flexible than current broadcast standards. Using the system, broadcasts can simultaneously send several video streams of varying bandwidths and additional streams of data. – Martyn Williams, TechHive http://ift.tt/2k9GAdm

ATSC 3.0: What you need to know about the future of broadcast television

ATSC, or Advanced Television Systems Committee, is the group that decides what over-the-air (and more) TV signals look like. Last year about 76 percent of US households subscribed to cable, satellite or fiber for TV, while 21 percent relied on antenna reception for at least one TV in the home. But that antenna number went up four points compared to 2014, according to the Consumer Technology Association (CTA). – Geoffrey Morrison, CNET

Mitsubishi’s SeaAerial is an antenna made out of seawater—yes, you read that right

The electronics manufacturer developed SeaAerial, a low-frequency antenna made out of seawater that can transmit and receive radio signals just like a metal antenna. The company believes that SeaAerial could be the first of its kind to receive digital terrestrial TV broadcasts. – AJ Dellinger, The Daily Dot
« Older Entries