Tag Archives: broadband

Cord-cutter broadband usage surges past 500 GBytes per month

According to the report, the Q3 2019 overall weighted average broadband usage in the US was 275 GBytes, a year-over-year increase of 21% over the Q3 2018 figure of 228 GBytes. During the same period, the median monthly weighted average usage increased nearly 25% from 118.2 GBytes to 147.4 GBytes, indicating said OpenVault that consumption is increasing across the market as a whole. – Joseph O’Halloran, Rapid TV News » https://ift.tt/35hBYXw

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13 ways to screw over your internet provider

Internet providers are real bastards: they have captive audiences whom they squeeze for every last penny while they fight against regulation like net neutrality and donate immense amounts of money to keep on lawmakers’ good sides. So why not turn the tables? Here are 13 ways to make sure your ISP has a hard time taking advantage of you (and may even put it on the defensive). – Devin Coldewey, Gizmodo » https://ift.tt/2ZJHqTy

Amazon plans nationwide broadband—with both home and mobile service

“The Kuiper System covers the area between 56°N and 56°S latitudes,” the Amazon subsidiary told the FCC. “Accordingly, customers throughout [the] continental US, Hawaii, and all US territories will have access to Kuiper System services. So too will customers in many other countries within the coverage area. The Kuiper System will not provide FSS [fixed-satellite service] in the majority of Alaska, however, because the state’s high latitude is outside of the coverage area.” – Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica » https://ift.tt/2JwITCQ

Ajit Pai admits FCC got broadband growth figures wrong

That mistake led the agency to announce that the number of Americans lacking access to a fixed broadband connection was down to 19.4 million by the end of 2017 from 26.1 million the year before. Turns out, the correct figure is 21.3 million — a big difference, for sure, but not big enough for Pai to backpedal on his declaration that the changes he implemented led to massive broadband growth… – Mariella Moon, Engadget » https://engt.co/2GXp0ng

House Democrats tell Ajit Pai: Stop screwing over the public

On Thursday this week, the Communications Subcommittee will hold a hearing about the impact of Pai’s net neutrality repeal on consumers, small businesses, and free speech. Witnesses who have been invited to testify at the hearing include former FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, cable industry chief lobbyist Michael Powell (who is also a former FCC chairman), and representatives of Mozilla, Free Press, and Eastern Oregon Telecom. – Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica » http://bit.ly/2HZDcQ6

Broadband industry fears come true: FCC rules are costing them money

Big Internet providers had been demanding payments from network operators such as Cogent and Level 3, which sell transit services to websites and other businesses that need to distribute Internet traffic to consumers. Cogent and Level 3 argue that they should continue exchanging traffic for free with Internet providers, while the Internet providers say Cogent and Level 3 should have to pay because they send more traffic than they receive. Cogent and Level 3 counter that they are merely sending traffic requested by the Internet providers’ subscribers. – Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica http://ift.tt/1RFGEuW

Why a free and open Internet is pointless

Simply put, a free and open Internet – which goes to the heart of the FCC’s intent – hinges on the ability of the IP networks to deliver and, even more importantly, perhaps, withstand the rising and relentless pressures of data. According to research house IDC, the data universe is growing by 40% annually, which means it is doubling in size, effectively, every two years. At that rate, the data we create, copy and download annually will reach 44 zettabytes, or 44 trillion gigabytes, by 2020. – Lloyd Carney, Fortune Magazine via Quartz
(Full Story: http://ift.tt/18OYdWx)

Google’s TV and Internet Service Is ‘Like Ebola,’ Analyst Says: Very Scary, but …

Google’s foray into high-speed internet and TV-service has signed up an “incredibly small” number of customers and isn’t a threat to cable and satellite investors, according to MoffettNathanson analyst Craig Moffett. […] “Google Fiber is a bit like Ebola: very scary and something to be taken seriously … but the numbers are very small, it gets more press attention than it deserves, and it ultimately doesn’t pose much of a risk (here in the U.S. at least),” Mr. Moffett said in a note Thursday. – Bloomberg News via Advertising Age
(Full Story: http://ift.tt/1Bke1HF )
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