Tag Archives: Carrier

Netflix price hike being passed on to T-Mobile subscribers

T-Mobile will continue to cover $10.99 for Netflix for existing customers for as long as they keep their plan, but the Netflix price increase of $2 per account will passed through beginning July 5. Customers on qualifying T-Mobile ONE voice plans who have or redeem a Netflix Standard two-screen subscription will see a $2 charge per month on their bill. T-Mobile ONE customers with a Premium subscription will see a $5 charge. T-Mobile One w/One Plus Family customers will continue to receive the Standard two-screen subscription for no additional cost and the Premium subscription for $3. – Ben Munson, FierceVideo » http://bit.ly/2Xfieju
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T-Mobile to Release Free Mobile TV Service in Coming Weeks: Source

[T-Mobile] has plans to launch the mobile TV service based on licensed Xumo technology through its Layer3 division, which provides free over-the-top (non-cable or satellite) television and video-on-demand services, the source said. Some customers will be able to watch live and pre-recorded content via mobile phones and through internet-connected devices, similar to AT&T’s Watch TV or Verizon’s now-defunct go90. The app for the mobile streaming service will come preinstalled on several T-Mobile devices, including some Samsung phones. – Michelle Castillo, Cheddar » http://bit.ly/2CLYFX1

Huawei and ZTE may face new US ban via White House executive order

Specifically, the executive order would allegedly order the U.S. Commerce Department to bar U.S. companies from using parts and equipment from companies that the government believes could pose a national security risk. The order, which reportedly has not been finalized, would use the government’s International Emergency Economic Powers Act as its foundation, which allows the White House to regulate and control commerce in the event of a national emergency. – John Callaham, Android Authority http://bit.ly/2RfEE4x

Samsung fined $5.7 million for slowing down phones, Apple style

A watchdog group called the Italian Authority for Market and Competition just issued South Korean electronics giant Samsung a fine for 5 million euros (~$5.7 million), via SamMobile. The cash penalty is due to the “Samsung slow down,” i.e., the phenomenon of smartphones dropping in performance after receiving new updates. – C. Scott Brown, Android Authority https://trib.al/rvYXi9f

Intel: 90% of 5G data will be video, but AR gaming and VR will grow

The [Intel] report is a wake-up call for some segments of the entertainment industry as it claims 5G is about to drive $1.3 trillion in new revenues to media and entertainment companies over the next decade. Ovum forecasts that user demand for video data alone will grow from a monthly average of 11.7GB per 5G subscriber in 2019 to 84.4GB in 2028, at that point accounting for 90 percent of all 5G traffic. That’s not just because videos will improve in resolution; they’ll also include additional embedded media and immersive experiences that improve the experience, and video viewing time will increase. – Jeremy Horwitz, VentureBeat https://ift.tt/2EeDlNI

Wi-Fi branding to get a lot simpler with upcoming “Wi-Fi 6”

The 802.11 group produces dated standards every few years, most recently 802.11-2016, and then publishes amendments to these standards. The amendments are named alphabetically, and it’s these amendment names that have come to be used to refer to particular Wi-Fi technology. For example, the original 802.11-1997 standard was amended by 802.11a (54Mbit/s over 5GHz radio), 802.11b (11Mbit/s over 2.4GHz radio), and 802.11g (54Mbit/s over 2.4GHz) and, correspondingly, we see devices claiming to support 802.11a/b/g. Most of the other letters are also used to define additional features. – Peter Bright, Ars Technica https://ift.tt/2IyzTMt

US Wireless Video Streaming Sucks, Study Says

US carriers were ranked 34th in terms of average network speeds (16.5 Mbps) and 59th in terms of users’ “overall video experience.” That’s on the heels of previous studies showing that US residents pay some of the highest prices for mobile data in the developed world (before one even includes a bevy of obnoxious, hidden fees). – Karl Bode, MOTHERBOARD https://ift.tt/2NLsjUK

Netflix and YouTube are most throttled mobile apps by US carriers, new study says

AT&T and Verizon were by far the most egregious throttlers, differentiating delivery speeds for streaming video 8,398 and 11,100 times, respectively. T-Mobile and Sprint differentiated traffic 3,900 times and 339 times, respectively. Most of this differentiation equates to throttling, the study concludes, meaning US carriers are slowing the delivery speed of the data based on the type of data it is — a violation of one of the pillars of modern net neutrality principles. – Nick Statt, The Verge https://ift.tt/2Q56KM7

T-Mobile/Sprint merger will bring higher prices, small carriers tell FCC

While T-Mobile has focused on building a better network in cities, the carrier has failed to offer strong coverage in rural areas and has deceived rural customers about the network limitations, NTCA wrote. The group pointed to T-Mobile’s admission in April that it failed to complete phone calls in rural areas and used “false ring tones” that created the appearance that the calls were going through and no one was picking up. – Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica https://ift.tt/2MFujx1
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