Tag Archives: Federal Communications Commission

AT&T to Pay $60 Million Settlement Over Accusations of Data Throttling

AT&T Logo
According to an FTC press release, the $60 million that AT&T is set to pay as part of the settlement will be used to issue partial refunds to victims of its alleged data-throttling scheme who signed up for unlimited plans before 2011. (The agency noted that those customers won’t need to file a formal claim to receive their partial refund.) Additionally, the company will be required to provide clear and prominent disclosures about its mobile data plans and any associated restrictions on those plans. – Catie Keck, Gizmodo » http://gizmo.do/iK6uxS5

Advertisements

Court rules the FCC can’t block state net neutrality laws

The FCC has won a key bid to uphold its repeal of net neutrality, but at a significant cost. A federal appeals court handling a Mozilla complaint has ruled that most of the repeal can stand, but that the FCC had “not shown legal authority” to ban states from implementing their own laws. The regulator was trying to “categorically abolish” states’ established power to regulate communications within their borders, according to the court. – Jon Fingas, Engadget » https://engt.co/2oWgXl0 [photo:Orin Zebest/Flickr]

FCC Says Gutting ISP Oversight Was Great For Broadband

With many of the nation’s phone companies refusing to upgrade or even repair their aging DSL lines, cable giants like Comcast are securing a greater monopoly over faster broadband across huge swaths of the country. That in turn is resulting in higher rates and little incentive to improve terrible customer service. The telecom lobby works tirelessly to keep this status quo intact. – Karl Bode, MOTHERBOARD » https://ift.tt/2TfLUhF

House Democrats tell Ajit Pai: Stop screwing over the public

On Thursday this week, the Communications Subcommittee will hold a hearing about the impact of Pai’s net neutrality repeal on consumers, small businesses, and free speech. Witnesses who have been invited to testify at the hearing include former FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, cable industry chief lobbyist Michael Powell (who is also a former FCC chairman), and representatives of Mozilla, Free Press, and Eastern Oregon Telecom. – Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica » http://bit.ly/2HZDcQ6

What to expect from tomorrow’s big net neutrality court hearing

[W]hat may be the most likely shot at restoring net neutrality regulations will come from a petition against the FCC filed by several supporters of the dismantled rules. The case, Mozilla Corporation v. FCC, will be heard by the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, and the court will decide whether the FCC, led by Chairman Ajit Pai, was within its rights to end the protections. – Colin Lecher, The Verge » http://bit.ly/2DLSeEW

Ajit Pai Knew FCC Cyberattack Was Fake for Seven Months but Kept Quiet

Released on August 8, the IG report found that senior FCC officials had misled Congress and the American public by first announcing, and later defending in letters to lawmakers, a claim that a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack had crippled the commission’s comment system last May, amid efforts by its Republican members to roll back Obama-era net neutrality protections. – Dell Cameron, Gizmodo https://ift.tt/2Bc2dUZ

The FCC Says Net Neutrality Lawsuits Are Moot Because It Already Repealed Net Neutrality

We’re all now awaiting the Supreme Court case, which will more likely focus on whether or not ISPs have first amendment rights rather than whether the FCC has authority to reclassify industries. As part of the filings for that case, the FCC and the Department of Justice have asked the Supreme Court to vacate the 2016 ruling, claiming that since it’s about rules that don’t exist anymore, it’s now moot. This would weaken many of the arguments of those suing the FCC, which point to legal precedent. – Kaleigh Rogers, MOTHERBOARD https://ift.tt/2MRP4BF

The Current Definition of ‘Broadband’ Is Too Slow and Ajit Pai Refuses to Change it

“It is time to be bold and move the national broadband standard from 25 Megabits to 100 Megabits per second,” [Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel] stated. “When you factor in price, at this speed the United States is not even close to leading the world. That is not where we should be and if in the future we want to change this we need both a more powerful goal and a plan to reach it. Our failure to commit to that course here is disappointing. I regretfully dissent.” – Karl Bode, MOTHERBOARD https://ift.tt/2vBGGjl
« Older Entries