Tag Archives: HiFi

Don’t Buy What Neil Young Is Selling

Though Young and Pono have failed to produce double-blind studies on the benefits of high-rate audio or their music player, inquiring minds have taken the time to do it. In a 2007 paper published in the Journal of the Audio Engineering Society, Brad Meyer and David Moran outline the results of a study in which they presented a large sample of “serious” listeners with a double blind test comparing 44.1 kHz audio from “the best high resolution discs we could find.” The goal was not to show which was better, but simply to find out if people could even tell the difference. – Mario Aguilar, Gizmodo
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Tidal brings high quality audio streaming to everyone — for a price

Today a Swedish company named Aspiro is releasing a similarly high-end service called TIDAL, […] You can listen on iOS, Android, or a web app, along with 34 home audio systems including Sonos, all for $19.99 a month. […] you can absolutely tell the difference in sound quality between existing services and this one, and at times its 16-bit FLAC files can be stunning. Tidal is built on the back of WiMP Music, a goofily named Spotify competitor in Europe, and so it comes with a catalog of 25 million tracks that so far has had most of what I’ve searched for. […] What Tidal doesn’t have is great design […] Tidal’s black-and-white hodgepodge likely won’t impress you. And those huge files you’re streaming have downsides of their own: there’s a noticeable lag when you skip tracks as the file buffers; saving files to your mobile device can quickly chew through your storage; and streaming for even a few hours over LTE could be hell on your data plan. – Casey Newton,The Verge
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Look out Spotify: CD-quality streaming service Tidal hopes to make a splash this fall

When [TIDAL] launches sometime this fall, new subscribers to Tidal will be greeted by a $20/month subscription fee — twice the cost of most low-res services. For the heftier investment, Tidal users will get commercial-free access to 25 million lossless audio tracks streamed in FLAC or ALAC format, over 75,000 HD music videos, and “tailor-made editorial” from music journalists. Along with its impressive list of audio partners, Tidal will also be available for both iOS and Android devices, as well as offering Web players for Mac and PC. And the company claims its first 16 partners are just the start. Tidal will look to garner more audio partners in the future and is looking to expand to as many as 50 countries worldwide. – Ryan Waniata,Digital Trends 
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Spotify has a new rival – a lossless music streaming service called Tidal

Instead of serving up compressed MP3, AAC or OGG files, Tidal streams lossless FLAC files that offer several times the bitrate of most other music services. When Tidal launches in the US and UK in the next month or so, it will boast more than 25 million lossless FLAC tracks, all encoded at 44.1kHz / 16 bit / 1411 kbps and you’ll be able to stream them over the internet as well as download them for offline listening. […] The service comes at a price, costing twice as much as rival streaming services like Spotify and Deezer. In the UK that means a subscription of £19.99 per month and in the US a price of $19.99. – James Rivington,TechRadar  
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