Tag Archives: Package

Sports audiences increasingly turning to digital

Each of the four top sports leagues offers a direct-to-consumer (D2C) streaming plan in the US, ranging from standalone services such as MLB.TV to NFL’s Sunday Ticket, which is tethered to DirecTV satellite customers and, as its name implies, limited to Sunday games. The pricing varies from league to league and depends on whether users pay monthly or seasonally. But, generally, users who buy entire seasons will shell out at least $250 per year. – Michelle Clancy, Rapid TV News » http://bit.ly/2G3WYHU

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Hulu drops to just $5.99 per month after Netflix’s price hikes

Hulu does have one price hike of its own: the company is increasing the cost of its Hulu with Live TV service, which will jump to $44.99 instead of the current $39.99. As a result, the gulf between the standard service and Hulu’s internet TV offering is growing wider and a dollar shy of $40. The justification for the uptick in price is an increased channel selection — Hulu reached an agreement with Discovery, Inc. – Chris Welch, The Verge » http://bit.ly/2FJzybc

FitzyTV Uses Your TV Everywhere Credentials to Stream 75+ Live Channels From a Single App

[FitzyTV] currently supports 77 channels, which appear on a standard grid guide. Some of those channels include locals like NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX and cable channels like CNN, Discovery, USA, TBS, and TNT. It even works with sports networks like ESPN, FS1, NBCSN, as well as Regional Sports Networks like NBC Sports Chicago, MSG, and NESN[.] – Jason Gurwin, The Streamable » http://bit.ly/2R9jaSC

YouTuber builds glitter bomb that farts on unsuspecting package thieves

Rober wanted to be able to film the entire incident as it unfolded. The result is an over-engineered bait package that took six months to develop, and used motion sensors, a GPS tracker, and the combined wide-angle cameras of four mobile phones. It even used fart spray to ensure the thief would throw it away, so that Rober could recover and reuse it. – Jon Porter, The Verge https://ift.tt/2rR54eF

Hulu Says Super Bowl Live-Streaming Outage Was Caused by Program-Extension Glitch

For Hulu, the issue was related to the streaming company’s system for extending live programming past its pre-set endpoint, according to a rep. In the programming schedule, NBC’s Super Bowl LII coverage was set to end at 10 p.m. ET, when the episode for “This Is Us” was supposed to air. For reasons still unknown, the live game was unavailable for some Hulu subscribers once the clock struck 10 p.m. ET. – Todd Spangler, Variety http://ift.tt/2sbSE3J

Nielsen Ratings Are Finally Adding Streaming Services To The Mix

Nielsen isn’t incorporating the entirety of YouTube and Hulu’s viewing numbers into its overall ratings equations. Rather, the company will complement its already existing live, DVR and On Demand stats with cord-cutter metrics geared to Hulu’s recently implemented live TV service, as well as the similarly conceived YouTube TV. Thankfully, there won’t be any medium-based exceptions in place, and Nielsen will be tabulating the numbers regardless of if people watched on laptops, phones, tablets, etc. – Nick Venable, CinemaBlend http://ift.tt/2uUOHRk

Hulu adds NBC networks to its upcoming live TV service

That means you’ll be able to watch Saturday Night Live, well, live, in addition to programming from USA Network, Syfy, E! Entertainment and MSNBC. Oh, and when the Olympics return, you’ll be able to watch them as the games happen. If you’re keeping track at home, that means Hulu will have all four major broadcast networks on offer in addition to its on-demand library. Basically, $40 will get you a pretty generous basic cable package, all without a cable subscription. Here’s to hoping that the company can ink a deal with Viacom as well. – Timothy J. Seppala, Engadget http://engt.co/2p1CELG

Local channels in streaming bundles: Why they’re hard to get, and how that’s changing

Broadcast retransmission fees are a lucrative revenue stream for TV networks and affiliates, and a big driver of rising cable TV bills, so streaming bundles could see similar price increases over time. PlayStation Vue is a great example, charging $10 per month more in markets where it carries a majority of live local stations. That brings the base price up to $40 per month—$5 more than the starting price of YouTube TV and DirecTV Now—even if you’d rather get those same local channels for free with an antenna. – Jared Newman, TechHive http://ift.tt/2q9OPHc

Sony’s Web TV Service Signs Disney and ESPN. Who Caved?

photo: Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images, Re/Code

The deal means Sony now offers subscribers the same stuff, more or less, at about the same price that they would normally get via conventional pay TV providers like Comcast and Time Warner Cable, which makes it the first Web TV service to do so. […] Did Sony offer concessions to Disney because it didn’t think it had a competitive product without ESPN, ABC and other Disney-owned channels? Or did Disney soften its stance because it’s now worried about the fact that they’re losing conventional pay TV subscribers? – Peter Kafka, Re/code
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Time Warner Cable will test internet-only TV in NYC next week

photo: Time Warner Cable, Engadget

Similar to Sky’s Now TV in the UK it will support a number of hardware platform but the plan is to focus on streaming TV through Roku’s set-top boxes, and any participants will get a Roku 3 for free. On top of their internet service, customers can pick up a “Starter” TV package for an extra $10 per month. Another option that adds Showtime and Starz will be available for $20 per month, and for those who want all the usual channels but without a cable box, a Standard option with Showtime and Starz costs $50 per month. Judging by the usual cable packages, Starter customers should have about 20 channels, while the Standard package has more than 70. – Richard Lawler, Engadget
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