Tag Archives: Resolution

Disney+’s The Mandalorian joins a long list of fake HDR content, analysis finds

YouTube channel HDTVTest is known for doing quality analysis of the HDR implementations in popular media like films, games, and TV shows, and it found that Disney+’s The Mandalorian live-action Star Wars series is the latest in a long line of high-profile content that is just SDR wrapped up in an HDR package. The show has none of the actual benefits of HDR and a number of additional downsides, such that viewers might actually prefer to disable HDR on their TVs when viewing. – Samuel Axon, Ars Technica » https://ift.tt/37Ceqyx [photo: Orin Zebest,Flickr]

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YouTube and Universal to upgrade 1,000 music videos

YouTube and Universal Music Group are committed to fully upgrading nearly 1,000 music videos, remastering some of the most important works in the history of the format to the highest possible standards. Each week over the next year, more titles will be added, with all 1,000 titles expected to be available before the end of 2020. – Robert Briel, Broadband TV News » http://bit.ly/2x6HHA3

Netflix quietly rolls out HDR video streaming support for Galaxy Note 8

Netflix has added the Galaxy Note 8 to its list of HDR-supported devices, which should make the format relevant to a much bigger audience when the phone is released on September 15th. The Note 8 will be the fourth phone to support Netflix HDR video playback, joining the LG V30, and Sony’s Xperia XZ1 and XZ Premium. – Dani Deahl, The Verge http://ift.tt/2eynYA3

Sharp is ready to sell 8K consumer TVs now that we all have 4K

Sharp will start selling its 8K AQUOS TVs in China and Japan later this year. Then it will release AQUOS models as 8K monitors for release in Taiwan in February 2018 and Europe in March — but no official plans for a US release. Sharp hasn’t listed a price for these screens, but a source told the Nikkei Asian Review that they may start at 1 million yen (or about $9,000). – David Lumb, Engadget http://ift.tt/2iSoGwW

Just after you bought a 4K TV for Christmas: UHD Alliance announces “UHD Premium”

While the core resolution of UHD remains unchanged at 3840×2160 pixels, any device bearing the UHD Premium logo will have to meet minimum specs for high dynamic range (HDR), peak luminescence, black levels, and wide color gamut, among others (full specs below). Effectively, the UHD Premium logo guarantees that the TV, device (such as a UHD Blu-ray player), or content fully supports HDR, and will work with UHD streaming services from the likes of Netflix and Amazon. – Mark Walton, Ars Technica
(Full Story:http://ift.tt/1MQxIwt)